Enjoy the inaccurately-named tribute to Ray Harryhausen; how often do you get to see Skeletor...

posted 18 September 2002
Enjoy the inaccurately-named tribute to Ray Harryhausen; how often do you get to see Skeletor dancing to a Japanese cover of YMCA? Only tangentially related to R.H. at best. If you're more of a fantasy fan, however, you may want to check out Lego-las, part of a whole series of Middle Earth in Lego (thanks to matt, who I now suspect is sending me links just so I have to keep linking to his site). People have way too much time on their hands. Or maybe boring jobs, like me. 8 more working days 'til Warwick!
On a lighter note, find out about making fruit flies gay, and trash Tokyo while using additional peripherals with the spectacularly useless Hubzilla!
tagged with
0 comment

On compulsory English speaking as a requirement for British citizenship: My probabily ill-advised...

posted 18 September 2002
On compulsory English speaking as a requirement for British citizenship:
My probabily ill-advised 2 cents: it's obvious that living in England, where the majority of people speak English, speaking English is a useful talent. It's equally obvious that speaking English should not be a requirement to live in the UK. Citizenship, on the other hand, is a different concept that revolves around whether the state would fight for you in a war: citizen (n) 1. A person owing loyalty to and entitled by birth or naturalization to the protection of a state or nation. In return for the protection of the state (and often the right to vote), the state usually requires you to fight for them in a war (if you are able) and various other conditions apply, which vary from nation to nation. I don't think it's unreasonable for a state to request that you do certain things if you are physically & mentally capable of doing so, if you get protection and voting rights in return. However, language is not one of those things, because language and culture are linked and both can shift. You can't stick a stake in the ground and say "this is the language we speak" because as America is coming to realise, that can change quite quickly. If you can manage your daily life, then whatever language you're using to do so is obviously good enough for the country you're living in. So yes to encouraging immigrants to learn English, and perhaps even providing free education to help them do so, but no to making it a requirement for citizenship.
tagged with
0 comment